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Programs Highlights from the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival

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The Aspen Ideas Festival is the nation's premier, public gathering of leaders from the globe to engage and discuss the ideas and issues shaping our lives.

MPR News presents five, one-hour highlight discussions from the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival on current affairs and issues that will give your listeners pause, and challenge their thinking. Air them individually, or as a full series.

"Highlights from the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival" are available to all APM affiliates; subscription to the APM Celebrates package is not required for carriage.

Speakers

William Bishop, Henry Louis Gates Jr, Walter Isaacson, Michele Norris, Jeff Raikes, Darren Walker, David Brooks, Norman Lear, Khizr Khan

Length

One-hour (59:00 with a billboard, newscast, and one floating break
(clock specifics will be posted to ContentDepot)

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Preview/Audition Audio available 9/22/2017
Date content will be uploaded - 9/29/2017
Rundown available - 9/29/2017

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Promos

Promos available 9/22/2017

Broadcast Window

Available October 1 through December 31, 2017, with multiple airings permitted:
Trust, Individualism and the American Identity
Black in America Since MLK

Available October 8 through December 31, 2017, with multiple airings permitted:
When Colorblindness Renders Me Invisible to You
The Second Big Mountain: The Next Big Challenge in Your Life
Popular Culture, Civil Liberties, and America

Broadcast Rights

Affiliate stations may carry this program multiple times before December 31, 2017. The program must be carried in its entirety. No excerpting is permitted. Simulcast streaming rights are available for this program. Prior to carrying this program, stations must contact their American Public Media Station Relations Representative.

Former Republican congressman Mickey Edwards and author William Bishop at the Aspen Ideas Festival.
Former Republican congressman Mickey Edwards and author William Bishop at the Aspen Ideas Festival.
Riccardo Savi | The Aspen Institute

"Trust, Individualism and the American Identity"
Trust in civic, religious, and academic institutions is at an all-time low in America. But this phenomenon did not, as some Americans might believe, begin on November 7, 2016. It has been on the decline for decades, and while it has been falling, individualism and tribalism have been on the rise. And these tribes — tied to each other with ever fewer common threads — are moving farther and farther apart in almost every measurable way, from geography to politics to economic and educational achievement. Where do we go from here? Can any of this trust be restored, and what does this all mean for our communities and our democracy? Recorded in Aspen, Colorado on June 30, 2017. Hosted by William Bishop.

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Walter Isaacson and Henry Louis Gates at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Dan Bayer | The Aspen Institute
Walter Isaacson and Henry Louis Gates at the Aspen Ideas Festival.
Dan Bayer | The Aspen Institute

"Black in America Since MLK"
How far have we come toward racial equality since the civil rights era? What does it mean to be black today? How can we have had a black president while events like Ferguson continue to occur? Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Walter Isaacson explore the tremendous gains and persistent challenges of these years, from key events and turning points to the struggles and victories of daily life, ideas that are not often said out loud, and questions that many are afraid to ask.
From a session recorded on June 25, 2017.

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A discussion about race and color blindness at the Aspen Ideas Festival with (from left to right) Darren Walker, Jeff Raikes and moderator Michele Norris.
A discussion about race and color blindness at the Aspen Ideas Festival with (from left to right) Darren Walker, Jeff Raikes and moderator Michele Norris.
Riccardo Savi | The Aspen Institute

"When Colorblindness Renders Me Invisible to You"
If you're white and middle class, you were probably raised thinking that discussing race was impolite. Color blindness was seen as a virtue — and it's a persistent one. A 2014 poll revealed that almost three-quarters of millennials believe we should not see the color of someone's skin. But in truth, color blindness is an insidious form of racial oppression. Two philanthropists discuss how this prevailing attitude of color blindness has affected social policy in this country, the philanthropic sector, and their own lives. The Aspen Institute's Michele Norris, former Gates Foundation CEO Jeff Raikes, who now leads the Raikes Foundation, and Ford Foundation President Darren Walker share examples of how they're doing to try to shift this prevailing attitude by turning directly toward race and equity.

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Conservative commentator David Brooks
Conservative commentator David Brooks at the Aspen Ideas Festival.
Ian Wagreich | The Aspen Institute

"The Second Big Mountain: The Next Big Challenge in Your Life"
In life, we all have annunciation moments — moments that prefigure everything that will come next. While they can happen at any time, they usually involve experiences of childlike wonder, said David Brooks, the New York Times columnist and NPR commentator.

"We all have moments of wonder and things we're kind of interested in, but the second phase of life is the initiation," Brooks said in his hour-long lecture titled "The Second Mountain: The Next Big Challenge in Your Life." The annual David Brooks lecture at the Aspen Ideas Festival was given June 30, 2017.

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Declaration on display
Declaration on display
Minnesota Public Radio Photo | Tom Crann

"Popular Culture, Civil Liberties, and America"
Norman Lear is the prolific television writer and producer of stories about diverse American life—among them "All in the Family," "Sanford and Son," "The Jeffersons," "Good Times," and "Maude"—as well as a lifelong political and social activist. Khizr Khan is a Pakistani American lawyer, speaker at the 2016 Democratic Convention, and parent of U.S. Army Captain Humayun Khan, who was killed in 2004 during the Iraq War. Born 28 years and 7,000 miles apart in Connecticut and Pakistan, today they are united as American citizens, friends, and agents of change. Aspen Institute President Walter Isaacson joins them to discuss pressing questions of our time. What does it mean to be an American? How do our politics reflect and impact us? What role does news and entertainment media play in telling our stories? And can our collective culture change?

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